Difference between revisions of "Template:POTD protected"

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'''[[Exercise: Westarctic Chill]]''' was a joint military exercise conducted by [[Westarctica]] and [[Slabovia]] on 5 August 2019 in Dundas, Ontario, Canada. It marked the fourth time [[Grand Duke Travis]] had participated in a joint military operation with another [[micronation]].
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The '''[[Antarctic petrel]]''' is a boldly marked dark brown and white petrel, found in [[Antarctica]], most commonly in the [[Ross Sea|Ross]] and [[Weddell Sea]]s. They eat [[Antarctic krill]], fish, and small squid. They feed while swimming but can dive from both the surface and the air.
  
The exercise was conducted inside a simulator room that utilized the ''Artemis: Spaceship Bridge Simulator'' program. This software was originally released in 2010 and is designed to be played between three and eight players over a local area network. In a manner similar to the television show Star Trek, each player uses a separate computer that controls a specific spaceship bridge station.
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The Antarctic petrel is the only known species in the genus ''Thalassoica'', and is a member of the family Procellariidae, and the Procellariiformes order. Also, this petrel along with the [[snow petrel]], the [[Cape petrel]], both giant petrels, and the two species in the Fulmarus family, are considered to be a separate group from the other Procellariidae members. They share certain identifying features. First, they have nasal passages that attach to the upper bill called naricorns. Although the nostrils on the petrels are on the top of the upper bill. The bills of Procellariiformes are also unique in that they are split into between seven and nine horny plates.
  
The [[Slabovia]]n Navey has a long history of running complex Artemis simulations in their dedicated simulator room, which has been christened the USS ''Don Quixote''. Their typical configuration includes computer terminals for helm, weapons, science, engineering, and communications. There is also a separate chair for the captain with a large viewscreen that is visible to the entire bridge. In the past, more challenging simulations have included the use of separate personnel spread out in different rooms communicating with the bridge via two-way radios.
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<p><small>Photographer: Nigel Voaden </small></p>
 
 
<p><small>Photographer: [[Chancellor Rankin MacGillivray]] </small></p>
 
 
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Revision as of 19:22, 9 March 2020

Antarctic Petrel.jpg

The Antarctic petrel is a boldly marked dark brown and white petrel, found in Antarctica, most commonly in the Ross and Weddell Seas. They eat Antarctic krill, fish, and small squid. They feed while swimming but can dive from both the surface and the air.

The Antarctic petrel is the only known species in the genus Thalassoica, and is a member of the family Procellariidae, and the Procellariiformes order. Also, this petrel along with the snow petrel, the Cape petrel, both giant petrels, and the two species in the Fulmarus family, are considered to be a separate group from the other Procellariidae members. They share certain identifying features. First, they have nasal passages that attach to the upper bill called naricorns. Although the nostrils on the petrels are on the top of the upper bill. The bills of Procellariiformes are also unique in that they are split into between seven and nine horny plates.

Photographer: Nigel Voaden

(More Featured Images)