Difference between revisions of "Transantarctic Mountains"

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The '''Transantarctic Mountains''' (abbreviated '''TAM''') comprise a mountain range of uplifted sedimentary rock in [[Antarctica]] which extend, with some interruptions, across the continent from [[Cape Adare]] in northern [[Victoria Land]] to [[Coats Land]]. These mountains divide [[East Antarctica]] and [[West Antarctica]]. They include a number of separately named mountain groups, which are often again subdivided into smaller ranges.
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[[File:Beardmore Glacier - Antarctica.jpg|400px|thumb|View of the Transantarctic Mountains from Beardmore Glacier]]
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The '''Transantarctic Mountains''' (abbreviated '''TAM''') comprise a mountain range of uplifted sedimentary rock in [[Westarctica]] which extend, with some interruptions, across the continent from [[Cape Adare]] in northern [[Victoria Land]] to [[Coats Land]]. These mountains divide [[East Antarctica]] and [[West Antarctica]].
  
The range was first sighted by [[James Clark Ross]] in 1841 at what was later named the [[Ross Ice Shelf]] in his honor. It was first crossed during the [[British National Antarctic Expedition]] of 1901-1904.
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They include a number of separately named mountain groups, which are often again subdivided into smaller ranges.
  
-Credit: Wikipedia
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==Discovery and name==
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The range was first sighted by [[James Clark Ross]] in 1841 at what was later named the [[Ross Ice Shelf]] in his honor. It was first crossed during the British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904.
  
 
[[Category: Geography of Westarctica]]
 
[[Category: Geography of Westarctica]]

Revision as of 08:29, 23 April 2018

View of the Transantarctic Mountains from Beardmore Glacier

The Transantarctic Mountains (abbreviated TAM) comprise a mountain range of uplifted sedimentary rock in Westarctica which extend, with some interruptions, across the continent from Cape Adare in northern Victoria Land to Coats Land. These mountains divide East Antarctica and West Antarctica.

They include a number of separately named mountain groups, which are often again subdivided into smaller ranges.

Discovery and name

The range was first sighted by James Clark Ross in 1841 at what was later named the Ross Ice Shelf in his honor. It was first crossed during the British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904.